Topic: Good rails reference for Beginners

I stumbled across this earlier and have found it to be extremely helpful, so I thought I'd share it, for those who (like me) are just getting their feet wet with rails.

http://blog.invisible.ch/2006/05/01/rub … reference/

Re: Good rails reference for Beginners

Might as well add my own here:
http://www.onlamp.com/pub/a/onlamp/2005 … rails.html - Rolling with Ruby on Rails, Part 1
http://www.onlamp.com/pub/a/onlamp/2005 … rails.html - Rolling with Ruby on Rails, Part 2
http://www.onlamp.com/pub/a/onlamp/2005 … _ajax.html - AJAX on Rails

Re: Good rails reference for Beginners

Thanks. I think I'll just sticky this so others can do the same.

Re: Good rails reference for Beginners

Here is my own contribution: So You Wanna Begin Programming With Ruby on Rails?

Check out my Blog.

Re: Good rails reference for Beginners

Peerless wrote:

Might as well add my own here:
http://www.onlamp.com/pub/a/onlamp/2005 … rails.html - Rolling with Ruby on Rails, Part 1
http://www.onlamp.com/pub/a/onlamp/2005 … rails.html - Rolling with Ruby on Rails, Part 2
http://www.onlamp.com/pub/a/onlamp/2005 … _ajax.html - AJAX on Rails

Those are pretty cool references for us beginners, pretty concise and shows how to get going. A few things needed to be added, for example the relationship between table names and rails stuff (hey l'm a newbie back off), isn't as well explained as it could be.

http://rails.homelinux.org/ is worth dialing into after the Rolling tutorials, the 4 day thing starts from Rolling and goes a bit further in explaining the relationships between the database and the rails stuff.

Will for sure be following these ones, before deciding which books might benefit getting a better understanding. If anyone feels like making one, a style guide to RoR would be useful, i.e best coding standards.

www.movieheretic.com - Reviews, Box Office, Chat from downunder. Now with added RoR goodness, beginner stuff.

www.skinbydragonfly.com - Invision skins, graphics, i-Tab revolution.

Re: Good rails reference for Beginners

The problem I find with these is that after basic scaffolds and the "magic" effect is gone it's not really fun anymore when documents are missing or sparce for a tiny bit more advansed stuff.. Like the API is very cryptic..

But what is advanced ? I mean, the majority of the users will be wanting tools like todo lists blogs, user admins stores .... it's all kinda stuff that is just expected of an app in this web 2.0 day and age of internet...

Last edited by tripdragon (2006-08-17 20:05:57)

Re: Good rails reference for Beginners

If you are having trouble making it past how-to articles, you may want to break the Rails learning process down and learn technologies outside of Rails first. Rails requires knowledge in both web development and object-oriented programming. If you have experience in both of these, Rails will come much easier.

Web Development
I think most people coming to Rails have a fairly solid knowledge of web development. But, if you aren't familiar with XHTML and CSS then I suggest creating a couple, simple static sites (non-Rails). There are plenty of tutorials out there on the web, so I won't link to any here.

Programming
This is where I think most Railers are lacking. If you are completely new to programming, I would suggest reading the Learn to Program book. It will teach you the basics of programming: variables, loops, conditional statements, methods/classes, etc. and all in Ruby so it's like killing two birds with one stone.

Even if you have experience with other programming languages, I'd still suggest taking some time out and learning Ruby on it's own. It has quite a few differences from other languages: blocks, modules, and symbols just to name a few. Learning Ruby on its own will make Rails that much easier to pick up. Get the Pickaxe and Ruby for Rails books to help learn Ruby.

Even after this, Rails still has a fairly steep learning curve. It will be painful to stumble through your first project, but after you get over that hill it gets easier and a lot funner. Oh and did I say it gets funner? smile

Railscasts - Free Ruby on Rails Screencasts

Re: Good rails reference for Beginners

I know, i know.. I need to read more and more.. But i already know css and html.
And  have read a lot about OOP, and ruby and Cocoa and Obj-c

But I do swear that ERB and Controller editing are two different beasts. They may have the same code base but hardly any of the options to input and use in thinsg like form objects and the further of advanced stuff is not highlighted to well. Or maybe I just don't get it,, but I as a user have spent a great deal of 8 weeks learning ruby rails and reading many books to just still be confused..

More reading is not the answer if all it gives are more tutorials on scaffolds... Not to say they are not appreciated, just really fallen over the great deal of "fun" I had at the beginning of following a tutorial.

And now looking for ways to make my own custom stuff.

Re: Good rails reference for Beginners

This is less of a reference than just a nice overview and persuasive argument  about why you should give Rails a shot: http://www.computerworld.com/action/art … c_li_story

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Rails Forum - Rails Jobs

Re: Good rails reference for Beginners

Some online tutorials are great to get interested and started, but in order to really start using Rails, it's important to read the Agile Programming With Rails book. It gives you a clear understanding of how the framework works and how to get started and be productive with it. It will save you a lot of time trying to figure things out on your own. Rails has very specific ways of getting things done, and you have to understand those before diving in. And if you don't know Ruby, then read Ruby For Rails as well. After those two (assuming you know HTML/CSS and some mysql you'll probably have enough to start building websites/apps and find out the rest from online helps, mailing lists, blogs, more books, etc.

Re: Good rails reference for Beginners

Another very helpful reference tool is the Rails API itself. It doesn't have as many examples as one would hope, but at least it gives you the syntax for all the commands. A fully searchable version in Windows Help File format (CHM), which also is readable on Linux with xCHM, is available here:
http://delynnberry.com/2006/10/16/rails … sion-1-1-6

Re: Good rails reference for Beginners

O'Reilly just published an updated version of Rolling With Rails a couple of days ago: http://www.onlamp.com/pub/a/onlamp/2006 … sited.html

Josh Catone helps run this place
Rails Forum - Rails Jobs

Re: Good rails reference for Beginners

Glad to see the old article is updated. I'm surprised they aren't using migrations to create the database though.

Railscasts - Free Ruby on Rails Screencasts

Re: Good rails reference for Beginners

Yes, they definitely should use migrations.

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Re: Good rails reference for Beginners

Zerohalo your post gave me a bit of encouragement after reading everyone elses posts. I code XHTML/CSS everyday at work and have some intermediate knowdledge or ASP/PHP and MySQL.

The Ruby For Rails book is a bit hard going at 1st but definately makes it easier to understand what is going on in the Agile Web Tutorials.

Re: Good rails reference for Beginners

I found this resource today: http://rails.raaum.org/activerecord.html - it really helped me get straight in my head a lot of the ActiveRecord stuff that's been swimming about my mind.  There's also good stuff on ActionController and ActionView, as well as having a lot of useful links dotted about where appropriate.

Re: Good rails reference for Beginners

thanks

Re: Good rails reference for Beginners

You may also want to check out http://www.gotapi.com. I have found it very useful.

Re: Good rails reference for Beginners

Check out http://wiki.rubyonrails.org
There is a good beginners guide beginning Ruby on Rails programming.

Re: Good rails reference for Beginners

Here are a few articles about Ruby and Rails. A little dated, but still useful. Include a few articles from David Heinemeier Hansson, lead developer of the Rails framework.

http://www.thinkvitamin.com/categories.php?cat=Rails